why we've grouped some questions around definitions?

Many today are caught up with attempting to give Bible definitions in terms of man’s definitions. They may use a dictionary, or go to the original Hebrew/Greek, and this can be helpful along with looking at how various Bible translations have handled it. But Paul makes it clear in 1 Corinthians 2:12-13 that Bible definitions belong to God, and God alone:

“Now we have received not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, that we might understand the things freely given us by God. And we impart this in words not taught by human wisdom but taught by the Spirit, interpreting spiritual truths to those who are spiritual.”

There may be no better application and example for how Scripture interprets Scripture than in providing Bible definitions.

  • The Journal of Joseph [Smith] The Journal of Joseph [Smith] It seems that there have always been “prophets” of one sort or another. [more]

    get the answer
  • Being baptized with the Holy Spirit (aka Holy Spirit baptism) is a remarkably hot topic – often disputed among Christians today. And yet, there is little direct Scriptural reference to the explicit act of being “baptized with the Holy [more]

    get the answer
  • Water baptism has something to do with water, right? Some believe water baptism is just getting wet (“sprinkling”) while other Christians insist one isn’t baptized unless the individual is completely submerged in water. In fact, [more]

    get the answer
  • The sinner’s prayer is something frequently referred to by preachers today. In fact, at the close of every sermon, Joel Osteen asks those that are not saved to pray with him. The prayer is asking Jesus to “come into [more]

    get the answer
  • False teacher. It can seem like a harsh term, but the Bible talks a lot about false teachers. In fact, it may be interesting to measure the 21st century Christian’s “shock-meter” against how the Bible describes a false teacher. Terms [more]

    get the answer
  • Invitations to ‘call on the name of the Lord’ are often extended by preachers and especially, it seems, by tele-evangelists. This may be at the end of their sermon when they invite the audience to recite a prayer, often referred [more]

    get the answer