Priests of God are most often associated with the Catholic religion. That tradition has specific qualifications to become a priest. “Catholic men who have been baptized, have undertaken their confirmation, and are practicing members of their local Parish for at least 2 straight years, can be admitted to a seminary to study and become a priest. After completing their studies at the seminary, and serving as a Deacon for a period of 6 months to a year, unmarried males between the ages of 25 and 63 can be ordained as a priest.”

Of course, Catholicism is not alone in their special ordination of a priesthood. Other Christian denominations (e.g. Episcopalian, Latter Day Saints), as well as other religions (e.g. Hinduism, Taoism), delineate special “priests to God.”

How Scripture answers "Who are the priests of God?"

Priests of God are all those that follow Jesus Christ1,2,4,7,8, the ultimate High Priest3. Priests/“Saints”6 of God, or the spiritual “sons of Levi”8, can be anyone4,5,7, but only those that have “put on Christ” in baptism5. This is especially poignant given David’s psalm speaking of saints “clothed with righteousness”6 and that they would bring “offerings of righteousness”8 (which defines the “works” disciples do).

Answer built on scripture-blocks below

But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people for his own possession, that you may proclaim the excellencies of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. Once you were not a people, but now you are God’s people; once you had not received mercy, but now you have received mercy.

You are a select race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people possessed by and for the God that called you out of darkness and into His marvelous light so that you might proclaim His promises. At one time you were nobody’s people without mercy, but now you are God’s people who have received mercy.

Peter is writing to the “elect” of the “dispersion” – Christians that have been scattered throughout Galatia and Asia Minor.  He is encouraging them to stand firm in the face of current persecution and reminding them of the promise they have in and through Christ.

In this chapter, Peter calls forward several prophetic statements including Isaiah 28:16 (vs 6), Psalms 118:22 (vs 7), and Isaiah 8:14 (vs 8).  In verse 9, Peter takes all of the characterizations that God made (through Moses) to his people in

Exodus 19:5-6
and applies them to Christians. Finally, in verse 10, he recalls Hosea 1:6, 9, 10, the same verses that Paul applies to the Gentiles being grafted in by God in
Romans 9:25-26
.
Scripture-block application to this question

The apostle Peter describes Christians as “a royal priesthood.”

John to the seven churches that are in Asia: Grace to you and peace from him who is and who was and who is to come, and from the seven spirits who are before his throne, and from Jesus Christ the faithful witness, the firstborn of the dead, and the ruler of kings on earth. To him who loves us and has freed us from our sins by his blood and made us a kingdom, priests to his God and Father, to him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.
John addressing the seven churches in Asia: Grace and peace from Him who is and was and is to come, and from the seven spirits before His thorn, and from Jesus the true witness, firstborn of the dead and ruler of kings on earth.  To Him who loves and freed us from our sins by His blood and made us a kingdom, priests to His God and Father.  To Him be glory and dominion forever. Amen.
The book of Revelation is what John saw and was told to write down (1:1-2). Using “in the Spirit” as a structural marker, the book can be sectioned into four visions in particular:

  • Vision One (1:9-3:22) – Jesus speaking to the seven churches
  • Vision Two (4:1-16:21) – Seven seals, seven trumpets, seven bowls of wrath; “one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls” introduces the last two (and therefore possibly connected):
    • Vision Three (17:1-21:8) – Babylon the Harlot
    • Vision Four (21:9-22:5) – Jerusalem the Bride
Scripture-block application to this question

The apostle John addresses his revelation to Christians, describing them as “priests to his God and Father.”

And being made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation to all who obey him, being designated by God a high priest after the order of Melchizedek.

And being made perfect/complete – designated by God to be High Priest after the order of Melchizedek – He [Jesus Christ] became the source of eternal salvation for anyone that obeys.

Arguing for those things that are better under the new covenant, the writer is pointing to the better priesthood of which Christ is the High Priest.

Scripture-block application to this question

If Jesus is the High Priest, His followers (“all who obey him”) would all be priests.

And some of them also I will take for priests and for Levites, says the Lord. For as the new heavens and the new earth that I make shall remain before me, says the Lord, so shall your offspring and your name remain. From new moon to new moon, and from Sabbath to Sabbath, all flesh shall come to worship before me, declares the Lord.

I [God] will take some of them for priests and Levites since your offspring and name will remain before Me just as the new heavens and new earth that I make remain before Me. From new moon to new moon, and from Sabbath to Sabbath, all peoples shall come to worship before Me.

The closing words of Isaiah the prophet.  There are many indications in the immediate context that Isaiah is referring to the oft prophesied “latter days” with statements (e.g. clues) such as:

  • “gather all nations and tongues” (vs 18),
  • “I will set a sign among them” (vs 19),
  • “they shall declare my glory among the nations (vs 19).

All of these statements would be descriptors of first century times.

Scripture-block application to this question

To the extent that we can apply prophetic, forward-looking language without an inspired writer’s confirmation it would seem this applies here. God says He will take some from “all flesh” (not just Jews) to be “priests and Levites” in a context that is very likely looking forward to the Christian age.

For as many of you as were baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s offspring, heirs according to promise.
Whoever has been baptized has been clothed in Christ.  Everyone [that’s been clothed] is one in Jesus Christ, regardless if they are Jew or Greek, slave or free, male or female. Likewise, if you’re clothed in Christ, you are part of Abraham’s spiritual family and heirs according to the promise made to him by God.

Paul’s letter to the churches of Galatia (a region).  Chapter 3 specifically argues the Christian’s justification through the [New] law of Christ, not the [Old] law of Moses, while at the same time, drawing strong parallels between the two. He has just stated that those “in Christ” are sons of God.

Scripture-block application to this question

All that have “put on Christ” (been baptized), are equal “sons of God” (vs 26).

Her priests I will clothe with salvation, and her saints will shout for joy. There I will make a horn to sprout for David; I have prepared a lamp for my anointed.

I [God] will clothe her priests in salvation, the saints will shout for joy.  I will make David strong, and My anointed one will be a light.

A song of ascent that was sung by the people when going up to Jerusalem to worship.  The psalm is filled with language and indicators that foreshadow Christ and the church age.

Scripture-block application to this question

Priests equal saints in this statement, which are clothed with salvation.

!! scripture-block context extra important here !!

Priests and saints are also equated in verse 9 where he pleads that “priests be clothed with righteousness”8.

And they sang a new song, saying, ‘Worthy are you to take the scroll and to open its seals, for you were slain, and by your blood you ransomed people for God from every tribe and language and people and nation, and you have made them a kingdom and priests to our God, and they shall reign on the earth.’

And they [four living creatures and twenty-four elders around the throne of  God] sang a new song that praised the Lion of Judah/Root of David/Lamb [Jesus] because He was the only one worthy to open the scroll with its seals.  He was the one that was slain and by whose blood people from every tribe and language and nation were ransomed to be God’s people. He made them to be a kingdom and priests to God reigning on earth.

The book of Revelation is what John saw and was told to write down (1:1-2). Using “in the Spirit” as a structural marker, the book can be sectioned into four visions in particular:

  • Vision One (1:9-3:22) – Jesus speaking to the seven churches
  • Vision Two (4:1-16:21) – Seven seals, seven trumpets, seven bowls of wrath; “one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls” introduces the last two (and therefore possibly connected):
    • Vision Three (17:1-21:8) – Babylon the Harlot
    • Vision Four (21:9-22:5) – Jerusalem the Bride

Chapters four and five begin the second major vision of the book. Specifically here, there is “one seated on the throne” mentioned several times beginning in chapter four, eventually identified as who would be God, the Father (4:11).  Surrounding and singing praises to Him are “four living creatures” (4:6) and “twenty-four elders” (4:4). He is holding a scroll that cannot be opened by anyone, except one standing beside the throne and identified as the “Lion of the tribe of Judah, the Root of David” (vs 5), and a “Lamb” (vs 6).

Scripture-block application to this question

A song of praise to Jesus that describes His followers as “priests to our God”.

But who can endure the day of his coming, and who can stand when he appears? For he is like a refiner’s fire and like fullers’ soap. He will sit as a refiner and purifier of silver, and he will purify the sons of Levi and refine them like gold and silver, and they will bring offerings in righteousness to the Lord. Then the offering of Judah and Jerusalem will be pleasing to the Lord as in the days of old and as in former years.
Who will be able to stand the day He comes? Since He will be like the fire so hot it can refine metal, and like bleach for clothes. He’ll sit in judgment and purify the sons of Levi, and they’ll bring Him offerings in righteousness. Then the offering of Judah and Jerusalem will be pleasing to God as in the former days.
Malachi’s prophecy to those that returned from Babylonian/Persian captivity around 450 BC. God, through Malachi, responds to the post-captive priests with a series of “But you say” statements, to which God responds in condemnation summed up in 2:8-9, “But you have turned aside from the way. You have caused many to stumble by your instruction. You have corrupted the covenant of Levi, says the Lord of hosts, and so I make you despised and abased before all the people, inasmuch as you do not keep my ways but show partiality in your instruction.”
Scripture-block application to this question

God through Malachi says that when His Son appears, “the sons of Levi” (e.g. His priests) will be “purified” and “bring offerings in righteousness” (e.g. good deeds/works).

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